Oct 10 2017

How To Have A Fun And Safe Halloween With Pets

As Halloween approaches, the kids are busy planning their costumes and mapping out the routes for the best trick or treating, while the adults figure out how to get the kids in bed early enough so they can go to school the next day.

For your pet, Halloween tends to be a frenetic holiday, complete with strangers at the door, weird noises and lots and lots of tempting treats.

Here are some tips to keep your pet calm and safe this year.

Lock Up The Candy–The ASPCA Animal Poison Control is flooded with calls about chocolate ingestion every Halloween. Chocolate contains a naturally occurring chemical that is toxic to dogs and cats when eaten. The darker the chocolate, the higher the concentration. The weight of the dog factors into the toxicity too, so your best bet is to keep all your candy out of reach. Cats can be poisoned by chocolate too, but most cats don’t have a sweet tooth and don’t eat nearly the amount required to see symptoms. It’s important to note that even if your dog falls into the “safe” range indicated by chocolate poisoning calculators, he should still be seen if he is showing symptoms.

Pay Attention To Ingredients–Candy other than chocolate can pose a risk. Artificial sweeteners like xylitol are also toxic, as are treats containing raisins.

Keep Glow Sticks Out Of Reach–The liquid inside glow sticks is nontoxic, but if your pet chews and punctures a stick, he can have what’s called a taste reaction, which include head shaking, hypersalivation and agitation. If your pet does manage to ingest some of the liquid, feed him something tasty, like tuna fish or wet food. You should also take him into a dark room to look for spots of glowing liquid left on the fur and around the mouth. If you see any, wipe it off with a damp cloth or shampoo out with dish liquid.

Keep Cats And Fearful Dogs Indoors And Leash Other Dogs–Constant knocking at the door or the doorbell ringing is enough to cause anxiety and fear in cats and fearful dogs. Keep these pets indoors, preferably in a quiet room away from all the activity, where they can’t escape. Consider sedatives for severely fearful pets. If you’re taking your dog with you while you trick or treat, make sure his collar is snug and keep him on a leash.

Make Sure The Costume Fits–Dressing your pet up?  Great! Send us a picture! Then make sure the costume fits well and won’t trip, tangle or choke your pet.

No Alcohol For Pets–Having an adult party? Keep those pumpkin spice cocktails and jello shots up high. The sugar content in such drinks can attract dogs, but alcohol is bad for your pet.

Happy Halloween From All Of Us At BSAH!

photo credit: Pixabay Creative Commons CC0

bsah6244 | Canine Health, Feline Health, holidays, Seasonal Health

Comments are closed.